SSD CT240M500SSD1 not showing in BIOS, SE or DM.

Kilobyte Kid

SSD CT240M500SSD1 not showing in BIOS, SE or DM.

Hi, A few years ago I bought my first SSD (CT240M500SSD1) and it’s been working fine until this week. I use Windows 10 which has forced a number of updates recently, which may have something to do with the older SSD I have not being recognised by Windows.

It’s doesn’t even appear in the BIOS and your Storage Executive, so I can’t change the SSD BIOS.

Is this drive dead or can it be revived?

8 Replies
Kilobyte Kid

Re: SSD CT240M500SSD1 not showing in BIOS, SE or DM.

Followed this...

https://forums.crucial.com/t5/Crucial-SSDs/Why-did-my-SSD-quot-disappear-quot-from-my-system/ta-p/65...

 

In the SATA enclosure on another computer MD did detect it and allocated a letter, but the disk space was 0MB. Nothing to format or read. 

I'll try leaving it connected while in BIOS for a while. How long does it take?

Kilobyte Kid

Re: SSD CT240M500SSD1 not showing in BIOS, SE or DM.

OK, it's dead. Bought on 27/11/2014 from ebuyer UK. Can't find any info on warranty, So can I return for a replacement?

JEDEC Jedi

Re: SSD CT240M500SSD1 not showing in BIOS, SE or DM.

The warranty on the drive is just 3 years.

 

Another option is to try a power cycle trick.  Leave the SSD powered on for an hour, then unplug it for a minute, then repeat another time or two.

 

I've also seen an SSD come back to life after sitting unpowered for a couple of years.

 

If you can communicate with the SSD, then maybe you could try a Secure Erase on the SSD, but the SSD will need to be connected to an internal SATA controller or to an external eSATA port.  Depending on the method used to do this, it could brick the SSD if the process does not finish as it will have set an ATA Security password which may be unknown.  Using  a Knoppix Linux boot disk where you supply your own password for the Secure Erase is the only safe way to possibly unlock the SSD later if the process fails.

Kilobyte Kid

Re: SSD CT240M500SSD1 not showing in BIOS, SE or DM.


@HWTech wrote:

The warranty on the drive is just 3 years.

 

Another option is to try a power cycle trick.  Leave the SSD powered on for an hour, then unplug it for a minute, then repeat another time or two.

 

I've also seen an SSD come back to life after sitting unpowered for a couple of years.

 

If you can communicate with the SSD, then maybe you could try a Secure Erase on the SSD, but the SSD will need to be connected to an internal SATA controller or to an external eSATA port.  Depending on the method used to do this, it could brick the SSD if the process does not finish as it will have set an ATA Security password which may be unknown.  Using  a Knoppix Linux boot disk where you supply your own password for the Secure Erase is the only safe way to possibly unlock the SSD later if the process fails.


BIOS but not Disk Management? Are you sure?
Please post a screencap of your Disk Management.

JEDEC Jedi

Re: SSD CT240M500SSD1 not showing in BIOS, SE or DM.


@ibrahimoviczlat wrote:

@HWTech wrote:

The warranty on the drive is just 3 years.

 

Another option is to try a power cycle trick.  Leave the SSD powered on for an hour, then unplug it for a minute, then repeat another time or two.

 

I've also seen an SSD come back to life after sitting unpowered for a couple of years.

 

If you can communicate with the SSD, then maybe you could try a Secure Erase on the SSD, but the SSD will need to be connected to an internal SATA controller or to an external eSATA port.  Depending on the method used to do this, it could brick the SSD if the process does not finish as it will have set an ATA Security password which may be unknown.  Using  a Knoppix Linux boot disk where you supply your own password for the Secure Erase is the only safe way to possibly unlock the SSD later if the process fails.


BIOS but not Disk Management? Are you sure?
Please post a screencap of your Disk Management.


 

 

@PrimalByte wrote:

Followed this...

https://forums.crucial.com/t5/Crucial-SSDs/Why-did-my-SSD-quot-disappear-quot-from-my-system/ta-p/65...

 

In the SATA enclosure on another computer MD did detect it and allocated a letter, but the disk space was 0MB. Nothing to format or read. 

I'll try leaving it connected while in BIOS for a while. How long does it take?


PrimalByte mentions connecting the SSD to what I'm assuming is a USB device.   Sometimes when a faulty SSD is connected externally after boot, it is able to establish limited communication for an extremely short time.   On Linux you can view the System logs which will show the attempted communication which makes it easier to see what is going on behind the scenes.  Windows hides most of these communication attempts from the user.   From my experience the SSD is communicating fully long enough to assign a drive letter, but I'm guessing communication breaks down immediately afterward hence the 0MB.   It doesn't show up in the BIOS because it is taking too long to establish communication so the BIOS thinks there is nothing there. 

 

 

Kilobyte Kid

Re: SSD CT240M500SSD1 not showing in BIOS, SE or DM.

Thanks for your solutions, but I'm making do without it. Looking at a Samsung drive or M.2. All the solutions are time consuming with a small percentage of success. I would have thought that Crucial would have a software utility suite to help. Also I'm concerned now about my two laptops which have the same model SSDs. Time to back up just in case. Thanks again.
JEDEC Jedi

Re: SSD CT240M500SSD1 not showing in BIOS, SE or DM.


@PrimalByte wrote:
 Time to back up just in case. 

You should always back up any drive, regularly.

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JEDEC Jedi

Re: SSD CT240M500SSD1 not showing in BIOS, SE or DM.

I've seen this behavior from all the major brands of SSDs out there.   While people should always have good verified working backups of their data, it is even more important when it comes to SSDs since they can die without any warning as you've unfortunately found out.   SSDs are much more complex than traditional hard drives and the odds of successfully recovering data yourself is much lower.   If you need the data from the SSD and you don't have valid backups, then a professional data recovery service may be able to retrieve the data for you.  

 

With this type of failure, there is no software out there that can help since the SSD isn't able to communicate properly or communicate long enough to do anything.